Last call, Fall interns!

We are in the final stretch of our 2016 season, and so are our fall interns, with only about a week left to finish their BIG, BIG sculptures!

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Where are you coming from and what were you doing?


I am coming from Easton, Maryland by way of St. Mary’s College of Maryland where I graduated from in May of 2016 with a BFA in Art and Environmental Studies. I chose to study art and environmental studies in my undergraduate career in pursuit of my passions. Growing up and living on the Chesapeake Bay has instilled in me and continues to foster a love for working with my hands and a strong attachment to the natural world around me. Prior to my time at Franconia I have worked restoring wooden boats, been a sailing coach and also worked at an oyster hatchery.

Tell us about you- what do you want us to know about you?


I love to create. Whether making works that are functional, or purely aesthetic, I enjoy the challenge and process that is involved with bringing a concept into three-dimensional existence. Each piece is a reflection of an aesthetic and subject or idea that is important to me; but also represents the particular period of time and surroundings present during when the piece was made.

What is your favorite tool and why?


Untitled design.jpgI am pretty attached to all of my tools as each is an extension of myself but my favorite is a little wrench that was my grandfather’s. I love old tools and the idea of working with a piece of history and I am also a firm believer in the adage that ‘things aren’t made like they used to be.’ The aesthetic and function of many old tools is unmatched and to have a tool that I am nearly genetically connected to makes it even more unique to me.

What was your first impression upon arriving at FSP?


CM: I was blown away when I first saw the park. I really didn’t know what to expect before turning into the parking lot, but I was immediately excited and intrigued. The park was in a flurry of activity when I first arrived and it quickly struck me as somewhere full of energy and creativity.

Where does your inspiration derive from? Who? What?


CM: My inspiration comes from mechanisms and materials, vehicles and vessels, parts and places, hardware and harnesses, landscapes and layouts. I gravitate towards certain aesthetics and functions, but also find myself inspired by the works and philosophies of other sculptors such as Mark di Suvero, Kenneth Snelson and George Rickey.

 What do you consider to be your most successful piece thus far in your career? 


picture1-00CM: I think my most successful piece so far is the final piece from my senior year of under grad, Remains. This work was fueled and influenced by the information that I was surrounded with through my pursuit of a degree in environmental studies. I wanted to make a sculpture that acknowledges the current trends of our environment. The steel cattle skull that I constructed was not intended as a dark forewarning, but more as a reminder of the impacts that humans may have on the environment.

What are you making for FSP during your internship? 


CM: I am currently working on a few small pieces that are focused on a combination of materials through the use of stone and steel with a focus onIMG_6578.jpg balance. However, the piece that I plan to install is essentially a large, steel diamond form with a weather vane at the top that will identify the cardinal direction from which the wind is blowing. As someone who has grown up outdoors and constantly on the water, conditions such as the tide or wind-direction are elements that I am almost constantly in tune with. For many, this is not the case. It often seems that fewer and fewer people sustain the faintest connection to the natural world around them. My piece seeks to rekindle a connection to the natural environment through a simple clarification of the wind-direction.

 

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Where are you coming from and what were you doing?


NO: I am coming from Bloomington, IN and just graduated from Indiana University with a BFA in sculpture and BA in psychology.

Tell us about you- what do you want us to know about you?


NO: Last year I covered my body in white acrylic paint and had to cut off all my hair to get the paint out.

What is your favorite tool and why?


NO: Safety gear. I’m always finding new and strange ways to get hurt on accident.

What was your first impression upon arriving at FSP?


NO: I arrived early enough in the day that I was there for all of the good-byes between the interns during the summer session. Seeing the strong sense of community that develops here formed one of my first impressions. The other being that I couldn’t wait to go big with my work.

Where does your inspiration derive from? Who? What?


NO: My inspiration derives from the human body itself and the history of my own. I am also inspired by the nature of performance work, the fleetingness of it and how the body becomes material. I am currently stuck on the work of Kate Gilmore and Marina Abramovic. 

What do you consider to be your most successful piece thus far in your career? picture1-0


NO: My most successful piece so far was one called Modification. A few months before the show, I decided I was going to practice contortion and achieve a certain amount of flexibility in a short amount of time. The goal was to physically push against the limits my body had set for itself. The structure I built for this performance had tracks for elastic bands to move within the structure, and the bands were wrapped around my wrists and ankles. The performance focused on the movement of my body when resistance was applied.

What are you making for FSP during your internship? 


NO: I’ve had the idea of Picture2.0.jpgmaking a large-scale see saw stuck in my head for two years now. It’s gone through a few variations in my head, but it has always included an enclosed structure on one side where you cannot see the person on the opposite seat. The see saw is going to go up ten feet in the air, and a ladder will be built into the enclosed structure for one person to get on the higher seat. It’ll start out as a twelve-hour performance where I will be waiting at the open end of the see saw for anyone to walk into the enclosed space and see saw with me.

 

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Where are you coming from and what were you doing?


HB: I came to Franconia fresh outta college in Bennington, Vermont where I was studying Visual Arts and Anthropology. After graduating and living briefly at a geodesic dome outside of Bennington, I drove my Astro van home to mom in Denver, Colorado to pass my time drawing, painting and sewing before driving up to Minnesota.  I had some exciting and inspiring stops along the way, including The City Museum of Saint Louis, and S.P. Dinsmoor’s Paradise Garden in Lucas, Kansas. You should check them out if you’re ever in the area..
*Some images of what I made in Denver this summer

Tell us about you- what do you want us to know about you?


HB: I tried to be funny..

What is your favorite tool and why?


HB: My favorite tools are my hands and teeth which I use more often than I should. I like them because they are builtpicture9 in and I can feel what I am doing better and don’t have to worry where I put the scissors all the time.

What was your first impression upon arriving at FSP?


HB: I thought “Wow, I’m going to have to make a big sculpture”. So I’m making a big sculpture.

Where does your inspiration derive from? Who? What?


HB: I am inspired by space and material. I try to find the best solution to work with both imitations. I am also inspired by my audience and how they are expected to interact with my work. For FSP, I noticed that big pieces that you could climb on were a hit. I liked the pieces that had an interior space that viewers could enter. And I felt like the park was missing something. I couldn’t stop imagining a big lady lounging in the prairie.

What do you consider to be your most successful piece thus far in your career? 


HB: For my graduating show in May 2016, I constructed a bar inside of the gallery in collaboration with my best friend Tayler Jones. In just one week, we transformed our corner of the gallery into a fully immersive installation of a karaoke bar. We painted the walls, hung a tin roof, made a paper mache bar and bar back. We hung our paintings and drawings and sculptures, we made karaoke videos and mixed drinks. On the opening night, we wore costumes we had made and served colorful drinks all night long. It was easy to se how successful this piece was based on how much fun our audience was having with it!
*You can see the karaoke videos at www.vimeo.com/hannahbrookman

What are you making for FSP during your internship? 


HB: My big FSP sculpture will be a large seated figure, which I am calling “Spa Lady” for now. She wears a towel on her head and cucumbers on her eyes. I am currently welding the rebar skeleton, which will be covered in cement and painted.

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Where are you coming from and what were you doing?


 HY: I’m  from Saitama City in Japan. I have been making a lot of  steel sculptures and doing collaborative art projects with other artists.

Tell us about you- what do you want us to know about you?


HY: Secret makes me a more interesting person…
I was  born  in  Saitam in 1991 and  grew up in Saitama until I was 15 years old. I  moved to Hokkaido,  which is top of north Island in Japan, to study art . I studied fine art and craft, contemporary art and sculpture. I  graduated  from Sapporo Otani University in 2014 and afterwards I worked at Yoichi Koushi High school as an art teacher for a year.
In 2015, I  worked at Royden Mills Studio as his assistant for a year.

What is your favorite tool and why?


HY: My  favorite tool  is a grinder; I can use a grinder pretty well.

img_0373What was your first impression upon arriving at FSP?


HY: My first impression of FSP: “there are so many  kinds of sculpture and  so many sculptures  in this huge site!”  Franconia is one of  the best places for a sculptor in the world. 

Where does your inspiration derive from? Who? What?


HY: My inspiration comes from nature and natural phenomenon. The most important things are feeling the nature and finding a sentiment.


What do you consider to be your most successful piece thus far in your career? 


HY: My most successful piece so far is “Invite to Steel“.

yamakawa_3
Invite to Steel, 2015

What are you making for FSP during your internship?


HY: I’m making a large scale  sculptural installation. I hope it is going to be a ‘thinking place’ for someone.

Stay tuned for our follow-up post: Cole’s, Hannah’s, Nicole’s and Hideki’s finished sculptures!

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